Your Insurance Could Go Up: Senators Back Another Bill to End ObamaCare

WASHINGTON, D.C.–It’s a sure thing that most Republicans support the repeal of ObamaCare, or the Affordable Care Act. But, Senators Roger Wicker and Thad Cochran are telling Mississippians that health insurance rates could shoot way up if a new bill, the Preserving Freedom and Choice in Health Care Act, is not passed.

The bill would make way for the dismantling of the ACA, according to a news release from both senators. The reason they say it’s imperative: federal insurance subsidies that are making policies affordable could be made illegal by a Supreme Court ruling.

In the event of a King v. Burwell decision that rules that patients enrolled in the federal exchange are not eligible for federal tax credits, the Preserving Freedom and Choice in Health Care Act would allow anyone who would lose their tax credits to continue receiving the subsidy through August 2017 for any offered health plan of their choice, said the news release.  Additionally, the legislation would end Obamacare’s most burdensome regulations by repealing both the employer and individual mandates which would allow for states to determine insurance coverage and benefit requirements, effectively removing the most burdensome regulations imposed by the 2010 law.

The Act would provide an option for people affected by the possible decision.

“This bill is a reasonable step toward allowing families and individuals, not the Obama administration, to make the health care decisions that are best for them,” said Cochran.  “It would also provide certainty for those who have purchased a plan in the exchange while the Congress seeks to find a long-term solution to fully replace the Affordable Care Act.”

“Americans currently receiving subsidies should not abruptly lose their coverage,” said Wicker. “This bill would help prevent innocent people from being harmed simply because they relied on the Administration’s unlawful actions. The American people have already suffered enough from the law’s skyrocketing premiums, canceled plans, and website glitches.”