Do’s and Don’ts: Thriving the holiday spread

Overeating is commonplace during the holidays, but people encounter it throughout the year. On average people gain anywhere from 5 to 10 pounds during the holidays.

Rebecca Turner registered nutritionist and host of Good things says not to be stressed out by the Christmas food spread and said that staying on track is key.

“The first thing that I would recommend would just be for people to stay on schedule,” Turner said. “In the morning schedule what you are going to eat  for breakfast, lunch, and a snack. Just make sure that each includes a big glass of water, a fruit and vegetable, or both.”

She says try to not skip meals, because people will just pig-out later and said to go for a walk after the big meal because it will help to boost digestion.

“On non-party days, just commit to clean eating and physical activity,” Turner said. “Add an extra 10-15 minutes into your exercise on those days, sort of like a deposit into your splurge days.”

Turner has a list of tips to side step overindulging in the festive food favorites.
  • Make a trip around the food buffet, before building your plate. This gives you the chance to select the foods that excite you the most, while bypassing on the dishes that you have access to all year.
  • Be smart and stay aware of salt and sugar. Over doing foods high in sugar and salt can have an immediate impact on your health.
  • When managing diabetes, you want to be mindful of the sweets, limiting yourself to one slice of pie or cake, or three bite sized goodies.
  • The easiest ways to lower the impact of a festive feast is to choose water and exercise.
  • Forgo sugary beverages to nix hundreds of calories and drink on low- or zero calorie beverages: water, unsweetened tea, or sparingly waters.
  • Get up and get moving about an hour after your meal to help your body naturally dispose of excess sugar and calories.
  • Take a walk, play a game of flag football or basketball with family.